Category Archives: Workshop Recaps

Stress Management, Workshop Recap

SDO: Self Awareness & Resilience, Workshop Facilitator: Catherine Cantieri, Workshop Category: You

Strategies Talked About in Workshop

90/10 Rule: Spend 90% of your time working and the other 10% taking breaks.
Challenging Task: Start your day with the most challenging task, rather than saving it for last
Control vs. Importance: Look at your stresses in two difference ways to help make decisions on how to manage them and which ones to tackle first.
Diet & Exercise: Start out using small goals for diet and exercise in order to stay healthy and decrease stress.
Different Spaces: Using different spaces at work at home for different tasks and projects.
Energize using Strengths: Use your Strengths to uncover what energizes you most when taking breaks and decreasing stress.
Engaging with people: notice how you engage with people that de-stress you, or add to stress
Gratitude: Take time out of your day to show people that you are thankful.
Interruptions: Allowing your phone, e-mail, and other interruptions distract you during work. Recognizing how long and how frequent these interruptions occur.
Intrinsic Motivation: Find projects and areas of work that you are intrinsically motivated to excel in.
Outcome Visualization: Visualize you main goal or priority each day.
Patterns in Triggers: recognize patterns of stress trigger patterns (who, what, when, & where)
Perception: Not all stress is bad stress an important thing to remember about stressors is that they have no meaning until we give them meaning. Stressors actually aren’t stressful, unless we decide that they are.
Role Conflicts: Recognize which roles in your life may be conflicting and why so you can address the problem
Run-Walk-Run Approach: Intervals of worktime and break time; 30 minutes work, 5 minutes of break.
Strengths of Others: Looking at the correlation between the balconies and basements of certain strengths, and focusing on the benefits (balconies) of those strengths that others show.

Next steps are to identify stresses you can control and stresses you cannot control and determine their importance.

stress

 

Leading Across Differences–Workshop Recap

SDO: Appreciation of Differences, Workshop Facilitator: Abdul Omari, Workshop Category: Others

Participants partake in an activity where they are forced to choose one and only one identity. After small and large groups discussions participants begin to add on more of their identities. The session is guided by activities and discussions that force us to think about how our identities grant or take away privilege.

In the end we should also be thinking about other people’s identities how best we can lead people from different backgrounds.
Next steps: Continue to tease out our own identities. How does context play a role in our privilege? How does context play a role in our comfort levels with our own identities?

LinkedIn Beginner Workshop Recap

Workshop Category: Professional Practice

Workshop Student Development Outcomes: Goal Orientation

Workshop Facilitators: Catherine Cantieri, Office for Student Engagement

In this day and age, with more and more of the hiring process being transferred to online processes, it has become very important that you create, update, and maintain a LinkedIn profile.  Linkedin is used by employers as both a screening tool as well as a verification of skills and accomplishments.

With that being said, don’t look at LinkedIn as this big scary thing on your to-do list. Instead, look at it as an opportunity to market your skills and accomplishments to the world. With over 60 million members in more than 200 countries and territories around the world; there isn’t a better way to market yourself to a multitude of companies/organizations at one time than by creating a LinkedIn profile.

The true beauty behind LinkedIn is that it gives you access to CEOs, recruiters and other employees at almost any company you would like to work for. There are members of every fortune 500 company on LinkedIn and many of them love to see young people reach out to them and ask questions. You’d be amazed how a simple message about someone’s experience working at your favorite company can turn into landing you a job at that company. Just be sure to keep your profile updated and looking professional as you are reaching out.

A few things to do when building your profile:

  • Put on a nice shirt (ladies) button-up (men), fix your hair and make sure you are looking your best. Then have someone take a nice head shot photo of you for you.
  • Get your resume critiqued by career services. This is a SELP requirement!
  • Once your resume is ready, transfer the information from it directly to your profile.
  • Have someone help you write an objective for your resume and then put that into the summary box on your LinkedIn page.
  • Add all experience (work and volunteer), skills, the degree you are obtaining, and any other relevant information/accomplishments that makes you stand out.
  • Add connections, join groups, ask for recommendations and be active on your profile.
  • If you are completing the SELP program be sure you meet all the Linkedin requirements outlined here.

For more helpful tips, connect to the Student Employment Leadership Program on LinkedIn! Also, please feel free to reach out to us and ask more questions about LinkedIn or the professional world in general.

Gift of Feedback Workshop Recap

Workshop Category: Others

Workshop Student Development Outcomes: Resilience

Workshop Facilitators:  Corey Bonnema, Office for Human Resources

This workshop was designed to address:

  • What feedback is and the difference between informal and formal feedback
  • Why routinely giving timely and accurate informal feedback has a strong positive impact on performance
  • How the Situation-Behavior-Impact (SBI) Feedback Tool can be used to deliver clear, specific informal feedback

Feedback is an important tool to use in order to reinforce good behavior, correct poor behavior and initiate dialogue that is geared towards finding the cure for a problem and not just a temporary bandage/medication. Feedback is not just needed in formal settings like a place of employment, but rather it is used in all aspects of life. Every situation has some type of feedback that can be offered and it is important to offer that feedback as often as you can so that people know where they stand.

When it comes to feedback, the sooner you can render it in an effective yet direct manner, the better. If you wait until the situation has gotten out of hand, the feedback you are giving is much less effective and is often coming from a place of anger rather than rational thought. For the most effective feedback; use as many details as possible and don’t attach the situation/behavior to the person. In other words, don’t name call or use statements like “You always” or “You never.” Those are exaggerations and negate the point that you are trying to make by putting the other person on the defensive.

As a student employee, if you are not receiving feedback, then it is important to seek out feedback that is honest and genuine. Don’t look for feedback that fuels your confirmation bias, but ask for what you are doing well in addition to what you need to work on. When you ask your supervisor for feedback and they see that you are serious about improving on the job, they will begin to see you in a different light and will trust you with more responsibilities.

Lastly, remember that feedback can also be positive. If you someone does something that you liked or they do a great job at a particular task, tell them. You will be surprised what a small complement does for the psyche in order to create positive repeated behavior.

For more information go to: http://www.myevt.com/news/retrain-your-brain-learn-amygdala-hijack

Intercultural Communications Workshop Recap

Intercultural Communication

February 13th from 1:00-2:30

Facilitators: Alexander Cleberg and Thorunn Bjarnadottir

This past Friday, for the first time ever SELP held a Intercultural Communications workshop that was facilitated be the Office of International Student and Scholar Services. The workshop was full of group activities, along with story sharing about different cultural experiences. Students learned to be aware of the difficult task that is communication for individuals whose first language is not English. Below you can find a brief summary of the workshop, along with some next steps for students and supervisors!

QUICK WORKSHOP OVERVIEW
•    Developed empathy through reflection on experience filling out a difficult form and practicing a new language
•    Understood how work practices such as forms privileges particular cultures
•    Practiced giving clear instructions
•    Practiced listening for clarity
•    Practice asking close ended clarifying questions

NEXT STEPS: STUDENTS
•    Be mindful of your expectation of those with a different level of language skill
•    Practice giving clear instructions in 3 steps
•    Practice active listening and asking close ended questions

NEXT STEPS: SUPERVISORS
•    Ask students to identify their most common instructions that are misunderstood by  international students
•    Ask students to share how they will understand international students differently

February 6th: Resume Workshop Recap

Workshop Category: Professional Practice

Workshop Student Development Outcomes: Goal Setting

Workshop Facilitators: Katie Ness & Erica Tealey, CLA Career Services

Click Here to view the PowerPoint Presentation from this workshop!

The resume (and cover letter) are the tools necessary in one’s search for a job or internship.  These two documents represent you “on paper.”

The idea is IF these documents are good enough, they will advance you to the next stage of the process – typically, the interview phase.

When you are assembling these documents, ask yourself…

  • What do I have to offer (in terms of education, skills, and experience) that would distinguish me from the competition, and be a good match for their company?
  • Use key words found in the vacancy announcement, job posting, or from their website.
  • Descriptive action verbs  are essential in highlighting skills to a potential employer.
  • Is the resume formatted consistently, and is it easy to read and understand?  (If your resume doesn’t look good, it doesn’t matter how well qualified you are.  Employers won’t read it.)

Employers tend to evaluate candidates based on RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE.  Knowing that means

  1. Internships are critical.  Do more than one if possible.
  2. Part-time and summer jobs are viewed as favorable too.
  3. For some jobs, research experience is just as good (maybe even better) than paid work.

Another thing to recognize is how highly regarded LEADERSHIP SKILLS are to an employer.

Therefore, I always emphasize the 3 E’s on a resume.

1. Education

  • Don’t forget to include your expected graduation date,
  • Your degree (BA or BS) and major/minor
  • Your GPA (many employers pre-screen based on GPA)

2. Experience

  • Separate out relevant (and “other”) work experience
  • Internships might deserve their own section on your resume

3. Extra-curricular activities that highlight leadership. Here are a few examples…

  • Welcome Week Leader
  • Ambassador
  • Campus Tour Guide
  • Officer in a club or organization
  • Community Involvement, etc.

Another thing to note:  more employers are viewing social media sites to view applicants.  What is your presence on social media?  Is there anything there that you would be embarrassed about?  I would encourage you to establish yourself on LinkedIn.  The 3 E’s can be highlighted there as well, along with recommendations and endorsements, and a professional head shot and summary section.

Resume Workshop – Last Workshop in Fall 2014!

Workshop Category: Professional Practice

Workshop Student Development Outcomes: Goal Setting

Workshop Facilitators: Katie Ness & Erica Tealey, CLA Career Services

Click Here to view the PowerPoint Presentation from this workshop!

The resume (and cover letter) are the tools necessary in one’s search for a job or internship.  These two documents represent you “on paper.”

The idea is IF these documents are good enough, they will advance you to the next stage of the process – typically, the interview phase.

When you are assembling these documents, ask yourself…

  • What do I have to offer (in terms of education, skills, and experience) that would distinguish me from the competition, and be a good match for their company?
  • Use key words found in the vacancy announcement, job posting, or from their website.
  • Descriptive action verbs  are essential in highlighting skills to a potential employer.
  • Is the resume formatted consistently, and is it easy to read and understand?  (If your resume doesn’t look good, it doesn’t matter how well qualified you are.  Employers won’t read it.)

Employers tend to evaluate candidates based on RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE.  Knowing that means

  1. Internships are critical.  Do more than one if possible.
  2. Part-time and summer jobs are viewed as favorable too.
  3. For some jobs, research experience is just as good (maybe even better) than paid work.

Another thing to recognize is how highly regarded LEADERSHIP SKILLS are to an employer.

Therefore, I always emphasize the 3 E’s on a resume.

1. Education

  • Don’t forget to include your expected graduation date,
  • Your degree (BA or BS) and major/minor
  • Your GPA (many employers pre-screen based on GPA)

2. Experience

  • Separate out relevant (and “other”) work experience
  • Internships might deserve their own section on your resume

3. Extra-curricular activities that highlight leadership. Here are a few examples…

  • Welcome Week Leader
  • Ambassador
  • Campus Tour Guide
  • Officer in a club or organization
  • Community Involvement, etc.

Another thing to note:  more employers are viewing social media sites to view applicants.  What is your presence on social media?  Is there anything there that you would be embarrassed about?  I would encourage you to establish yourself on LinkedIn.  The 3 E’s can be highlighted there as well, along with recommendations and endorsements, and a professional head shot and summary section.